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dadeennbsv

Kurayami Box

System: LARP

Af

✏️Nomachi Inemuri

Foromtale

https://gem-quart-44c.notion.site/Kurayami-Box-0f9c41cfba0f4ee0be3b8b733b24110b

Styles of Play: Larp, Solo Play

プレイヤー自身と自分の中に入り込んだキャラクターをルーチンとウォーキングで5日間グラウンディング(精神的・身体的バランスを取ること)&ダイエット(目標-1kg)する日々の日記をつけていく1人用ジャーナリングLARP。

Tags: ジャーナリング、ダイエット、LARP、グラウンディングソロプレイ、

Spillet på

Golden Cobra Challenge (2021)

Priser

Golden Cobra Challenge (2021)

Vinder, Best Incorporation of Local Traditions
Kurayami Matsuri, or the Festival of Darkness, is the local tradition that Nomachi Inemuri explores in the game Kurayami Box. While it is a solo journaling game, it directly addresses pandemic conditions and allows players to integrate Shinto prayers into their rejuvenating play.

"Kurayami Matsuri" is a traditional Japanese festival held in "Fuchu City, Tokyo". In particular, it has a strong taste as a "Shinto ritual", and the practice of "not being allowed to see precious things" is a characteristic that is unique to Japan and has a high degree of regionality. It is called "Dark Festival" because "it is not allowed to see" "the sacred spirit moves from the shrine to the portable shrine and then departs", so it is "performed in the dark." In the Kurayami Box, the spirit of "self" on another world line axis is "healed" and healed while the "person" who has become a "box" takes a walk without being seen by people at night. Depart the spiritual body to the next world. Because I am doing that, I can say that I am "made" when it comes to "incorporating the traditional culture of the region."

Also, since the "Kurayami Festival" is a festival of shrines, it is one of the religious events called "Shinto". "Norito" is like a spell used in "Shinto." Also, chanting the congratulatory words with the sounds of "3," "5," and "7," is an excellent way to incorporate traditional things. In Japan, we celebrate when we are "3 years old (female and male)," "5 years old (male)," and "7 years old (female)," because these numbers are considered "auspicious numbers." In addition, the "Shimenawa" displayed in shrines and the like is written as "753 ropes," and in any case, the game actively incorporates numbers that symbolize traditional culture for Japan.

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